Knowledge Tree: Top 5 Amazing Tools Knowledge Tree

Knowledge Tree

Short Summary of knowledge Tree

  1. A knowledge tree is a tool that helps you organize and manage your information, insights, and learnings in a tree-like structure. You can use a knowledge tree to learn new topics, organize your information, or share your knowledge with others. A knowledge tree consists of a trunk, branches, and leaves, where each part represents a different level of detail and relation to the main topic. You can use different formats, such as bookmarks, files, and notes, to store your information in your tree. You can also use tools like graphic art to create visuals for your tree.
  2. A based on the theory of constructivism, which states that people create knowledge by building mental structures, or schema, in a way that makes sense to them. It can help you be an active curator of your own viewpoint on the world, and not a passive recipient of someone else’s viewpoint. A knowledge tree can also help you resist the urge to keep information that is not useful or relevant to you, and be more selective and intentional about what you keep and use.

It is a metaphor or a tool that can help you organise and manage your information, insights, and learnings. It can also help you visualise the relations among different topics and subtopics in a hierarchical way. 

There are different ways to create and use, depending on your purpose and preference. Some examples are:

A knowledge tree based on philosophy

where the trunk represents the main subject of philosophy, the branches represent the different branches of philosophy, such as metaphysics, ethics, logic, etc., and the leaves represent the specific concepts and questions within each branch.

A knowledge tree based on document management

 where the trunk represents the topic of the document, the branches represent the categories or subtopics of the document, such as introduction, methods, results, etc., and the leaves represent the files, notes, and bookmarks related to each category.

A knowledge tree based on social forestry

 where the trunk represents the concept of social forestry, the branches represent the three criteria of effectiveness, efficiency, and equity (3E), and the leaves represent the ideas, evidence, and tools to help users apply the 3E criteria in different contexts.

You can also create your own knowledge tree based on your interests and needs. For example, you can create a knowledge tree based on your school, work, personal development, hobbies, household, or finances. You can use a knowledge tree to store and access your information in different formats, such as bookmarks, files, and notes. You can also use a knowledge tree to be more intentional and selective about the information you keep and use. 

Who invented the knowledge tree?

There is no definitive answer to who invented the knowledge tree, as different thinkers have used different versions of the metaphor to describe the structure and relations of knowledge. However, one of the earliest and most influential examples of a knowledge tree was presented by the French philosopher René Descartes in the preface to the French translation of his work Principles of Philosophy in 16441. He described knowledge as a tree, where the roots are metaphysics, the trunk is physics, and the branches are all the other sciences, such as medicine, mechanics, and ethics1. He used this image to show how philosophy can provide the foundation and the unity for all the fields of knowledge.

Other thinkers have also used the knowledge tree metaphor to represent their own views of knowledge. For example, the editors of the Encyclopédie, Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d’Alembert, created a figurative system of human knowledge in 1751, which was a tree that divided knowledge into three main branches: memory, reason, and imagination. They used this image to show how knowledge can be classified and organised according to different faculties of the mind.

More recently, the psychologist Gregg Henriques developed the Tree of Knowledge System in 1997, which is a new map of Big History that traces cosmic evolution across four different planes of existence: matter, life, mind, and culture3. He used this image to show how knowledge can be unified and integrated across different domains of science.

These are some of the examples of how different thinkers have used the knowledge tree metaphor to represent their own perspectives on knowledge. You can learn more about them by following the links below:

  • Tree of knowledge (philosophy) – Wikipedia
  • Figurative system of human knowledge – Wikipedia

What is the concept of a knowledge tree?

The concept of a knowledge tree is a way of organising and managing your information, insights, and learnings in a tree-like structure. A knowledge tree consists of a trunk, branches, and leaves, where each part represents a different level of detail and relation to the main topic. A knowledge tree can help you visualise, navigate, and access your information easily and effectively. 

For example, if you want to create a knowledge tree for web development, you can have web development as your trunk, projects, clients, skills, tools, and resources as your branches, and specific information about each branch as your leaves. You can use different formats, such as bookmarks, files, and notes, to store your information in your tree. You can also use tools like graphic_art to create visuals for your tree.

Knowledge tree is based on the theory of constructivism, which states that people create knowledge by building mental structures, or schema, in a way that makes sense to them. A knowledge tree can help you be an active curator of your own viewpoint on the world, and not a passive recipient of someone else’s viewpoint. Knowledge tree can also help you resist the urge to keep information that is not useful or relevant to you, and be more selective and intentional about what you keep and use. 

If you want to learn more about how to create and use a knowledge tree, you can check out these resources:

  • How to get started with your knowledge tree – Emberly Blog
  • Knowledge Trees Step 1: Explain the Activity
  • What is the Knowledge Tree? | RECOFTC

How do I create a knowledge tree?

There are different ways to create a knowledge tree, depending on your purpose and preference. 

  • Decide on the core elements of your knowledge tree. These are the main topics or areas that you want to learn about or organise your information around. For example, if you want to create a knowledge tree for your school, you can include subjects like maths, science, history, etc
  • Choose your knowledge base content. This is the information that you want to store and access in. You can use different formats, such as bookmarks, files, and notes. You can also use various sources, such as books, websites, videos, etc. Try to be selective and intentional about the information that you keep and use.
  • Agree on the structure of articles. This is how you break down your core elements into smaller subtopics and concepts. You can use a hierarchical structure, where each subtopic is a branch or a leaf of the main topic. You can also use a network structure, where each subtopic is connected to other related subtopics. The structure should help you visualise and navigate  easily.
  • Write a articles. This is where you create and edit your content for each subtopic or concept. You should write in simple language, avoid jargon, and explain ideas like your readers are 10 years old3. You should also break up long blocks of text with white space, and include illustrations, screenshots, and videos to describe concepts3. You can also add alt text to images to increase accessibility.

What are some tools to make a knowledge tree?

There are many tools that can help you make a knowledge tree, depending on your needs and preferences. Some of them are:

Emberly

 A web-based platform that lets you create and manage your knowledge tree online. You can store bookmarks, files, and notes in your tree, and access them from any device. You can also share your tree with others and collaborate on learning.

Medium

A popular blogging platform that lets you write and publish your knowledge tree articles online. You can use a hierarchical structure to organise your articles, and add visuals, links, and comments to enhance your content.

Canva

A graphic design tool that lets you create and edit decision trees and other diagrams online. You can use templates, icons, shapes, and colours to design your visuals, and download or share them online.

GitHub:

 A code hosting platform that lets you store and sync your knowledge tree files and notes offline. You can use version control, branches, and repositories to manage your content, and collaborate with others on projects.

Edutopia

A website that provides resources and ideas for education and learning. You can use their articles, videos, and guides to inspire and inform your knowledge tree content, and join their community to connect with other learners.

These are some of the tools that I found from the web search results. You can explore more tools and find the ones that suit you best. I hope this helps you make. If you have any more questions, feel free to ask me. 

Can you give me an example of how to use a knowledge tree in my work?

Sure, I can give you an example of how to use a knowledge tree in your work. 

Let’s say you are a web developer who works on different projects for different clients. You want to use a knowledge tree to store and access your information, insights, and learnings related to your work.

Here are some possible steps to create and use your knowledge tree:

  • Decide on the core elements. These are the main topics or areas that you want to learn about or organize your information around. For example, you can include your projects, your clients, your skills, your tools, and your resources as your core elements1.
  • Choose base content. This is the information that you want to store and access in your knowledge tree. You can use different formats, such as bookmarks, files, and notes. You can also use various sources, such as code snippets, documentation, tutorials, etc. Try to be selective and intentional about the information that you keep and use.
  • Agree on the structure articles. This is how you break down your core elements into smaller subtopics and concepts. You can use a hierarchical structure, where each subtopic is a branch or a leaf of the main topic. You can also use a network structure, where each subtopic is connected to other related subtopics. The structure should help you visualise and navigate easily.
  • Write articles. This is where you create and edit your content for each subtopic or concept. You should write in simple language, avoid jargon, and explain ideas like your readers are 10 years old3. You should also break up long blocks of text with white space, and include illustrations, screenshots, and videos to describe concepts3. You can also add alt text to images to increase accessibility.
  • Add visuals to your content. This is where you enhance your content with images, diagrams, charts, graphs, etc. that can help you convey your information more effectively. You can use tools like graphic art to create your own visuals, or use existing ones from the web. You should also cite your sources and give credit to the original creators.

What are some benefits of using a knowledge tree?

Some benefits of using are:

  • It can help you organize and manage your information, insights, and learnings in a tree-like structure, which can help you visualise, navigate, and access your information easily and effectively.
  • It can help you be an active curator of your own viewpoint on the world, and not a passive recipient of someone else’s viewpoint. You can choose what information to keep and use, and how to structure and relate it.
  • It can help you store and access different formats of information, such as bookmarks, files, and notes, in one place. You can also use tools like graphic art to create visuals for your tree.
  • It can help you learn new topics, organize your information, or share your knowledge with others. You can use a different areas, such as school, work, personal development, hobbies, household, or finances.
  • It can help you make timely, informed, and accurate decisions, based on the rich knowledge assets that you have in your tree.

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